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Author Topic:  Are we really this short of ideas??  (Read 24880 times)

Northoftheborder

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Are we really this short of ideas??
« on: April 15, 2014, 04:41:50 PM »
That's not us, of course! Our forum can often surprise, is rarely dull - and welcomes everyone! But it's not always the same when listening to some of the BBC's local radio, is it? You could even be excused for thinking there's a desperate ideas shortage, if today was anything to go by!

A spare hour or two was spent listening to Radio Stoke's afternoon show, as I struggled vainly to see much sign of intelligent life in a dreary, decidely same-y midweek edition. In all honesty, I began to wonder if James Watt's programme can possibly get much worse? Having presumably exhausted a limited supply of "stories making the news today", James turned his attention to that trusted old standby - what's on television tonight?

New BBC Two series, The Big Allotment Challenge was summarily dismissed as "dull television" - however you could almost sense the "lightbulb moment" as James proceeded to enquire: "What ideas do you have for your own dull television shows? Text us on 81333, starting your message with the word Stoke".

Notably, no mention of any e-mail contact address, so I can only agree with Dennis' previous concerns, that this form of communication is steadily being marginalised - so removing the danger of any measured, thoughtful comments breaking through.

Now please don't let me be misunderstood - there ought perhaps to be an element of entertainment in afternoon scheduling, with a lighter touch than the peaktime shows, such as "Breakfast", or "Drivetime". But is this the very best Radio Stoke can offer? Did we really have to lose Paula White, just to accommodate such a sub-standard substitute? If you think I'm being harsh, just think about this:

James Watt has posed pretty much the same question at least twice this year, often on a Tuesday, tending to tie in with so-called "reality" programming - often on BBC Two. Which raises one or two interesting points, doesn't it? Is he so short of inspiration that he's reduced to criticising television made by his own employers? Are those same employers so short of common sense that they're oblivious to their own employee so blatantly biting the hand that's feeding him?

I know it's not a TV forum, so it's immaterial whether you care much for The Big Allotment Challenge, or not! But it's fairly clear to this listener that - rather than accusing his own employers of providing "dull television" - James Watt ought to consider how "entertaining his own stale format isn't...

Tiger

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2014, 09:00:57 PM »
Hi North,

Thankyou for your comments about the Forum.

When I listened to James Watt, I was very surprised by his dull format. I think that it probably takes a very confident and talented presenter to run a show based only on the personality of the presenter?

Where are the features and guests?


My local station(BBC Surrey/Sussex) runs a very good feature, for example at lunchtime ,which has a guest contributor(today it was a media academic from Brighton University, tomorrow it may be the manager of a farm shop) and together with the presenter they go through the newspapers and put a local twist in. It is a bit like the paper review on the newschannels. It is a simple idea but it really works.


Does James Watt have any regular features? creativity is free and makes the difference between a dull boring program on local radio and something that is refreshing and entertaining.

Can I ask? what happens when you or anyone sends in emails to BBC Stoke? are they read out and if so are they followed up with confirmation that it was an email and the email address?

mel

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2014, 10:15:06 PM »
I personally think that when listening to radio or watching TV you mustn't forget there are other channels, and being selective is very important.
I never just stick to one TV or radio channel and I make good use of the remote control. Its far too easy to get bogged down to only one media source.

As for radio "guest contributors and emails " being read out. BBC Radio London does a wonderful job in involving the listener.
All the shows are emails , texts and phone-call based. They also invite callers to come into the studio on certain shows.
I must say they seem to have got it right , but of course nothings perfect and that's when the tuning button comes in handy.

Northoftheborder

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2014, 04:49:53 PM »
Hiya everyone, sorry to be boring you with Radio Stoke stuff again, but that's the whole point - it's SO boring, so often! Dead right what you say Mel, we can always retune (and I often do) but I'm in the fortunate position of just living slightly north of their area (= Northofthe border, you see?) so I've got two other BBC local offerings to switch between - my actual local station (Manchester) and those lovely weekend programmes on Radio Merseyside! Never forget though - if listeners drift away, will they be so keen to return?

A few general comments to help you Tiger, as I think you've had the "pleasure" of James Watt's weekday afternoon show - as well as that extra Sunday morning outing, that began at the start of February. One or two guests can be heard (per day) during the week, although they tend to be pretty much from the "showbiz" side. TBH there's not too much wrong with that - within reason - and I'd guess a fair chunk of these must be celebs "doing the rounds" so will most likely feature on other local afternoon shows (so obviously, many are done "down the line" from somewhere like London), unfortunately James' interviewing style can be patchy, at best!

On the plus side, he occasionally features live music guests, either in the studio (or down the line) giving us acoustic renditions of their material - and it's also fair to say that James Watt's show page on the Radio Stoke website provides (what I think are) permanent links to some of these, so maybe anyone who's unsure of the worth of these could visit one or two of these (if you find yourself at a loose end over Easter). Unfortunately, not all of them get uploaded - but I'm not sure why that is?

Aside from daily team quiz "Watt's The Answer" there aren't really any features to speak of, so all we get are occasional, indifferent topics along the lines of: "...as Paul Hollywood's coming on, what song's best to introduce him?". Considering that (despite the best efforts of a few diehard listeners) all James could manage that day was "Baker Street", maybe you'll see why I reckon he's several ideas short of a full and entertaining show, most days! The opportunity's never offered to contribute your own questions to "WTA", for instance.

Then again, are we missing a trick here? If Gary Andrews allows James Watt to ask his listeners to phone in, or text a few vague song ideas (the e-mail address is NEVER read out - excepting the occasional requests to submit your own "WTA" team) then he's - almost - fulfilling the service licence aspiration to allow them to join in. Despite many suggestions however, we seldom hear many original records within this context. Strangely though, never heard anyone ask for "Hungry Eyes" (or anything else by Eric Carmen).

Regarding the Sunday show, my sister did make an early attempt at submitting a half-decent idea, for the so-called "new" feature James Watt's 9:00 Connection, but Gary Andrews didn't seem too keen to let her "Be Part Of It". Or anyone else for that matter, as this feature has now been running for ten weeks - but James Watt has never shown the slightest sign of inviting any of his audience to contribute their own ideas.

That's such a shame, not just from a personal point of view, but especially when you consider how much genuine entertainment exudes - each week - from Radio Merseyside's Sunday Brunch, where they allow listeners to suggest a few records. Come on Radio Stoke - where's the harm in a few tunes that your audience have suggested?

And where's the harm in allowing listeners to actually e-mail contributions? Even if a few know what the e-mail address is, it's not often you hear how many listeners have actually sent it this way?

Rita

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2014, 05:34:55 PM »
I would think James Watts email address would be:-

james.watts@bbc.co.uk

I can't imagine what the problem is at Radio Stoke - no such problems on Radio Merseyside - and that's what's made it the excellent local radio station it is.

Sorry to keep going on about this, but didn't Lord Hall say that he wanted the BBC  to be closer to the listeners and take on board what they had to say etc. etc?

What's gone wrong then?  Perhaps,you should try either writing to him or emailing him personally - though I would be surprised if you got any response from him or anyone connected to him and that is a sign of bad manners and shows a lack of courtesy I would suggest.

I can't comment about Jason Hardy because it is my choice not to listen to him, but I think you will find that ALL presenters respond to the public they serve  and put on superb shows - Jason is not the only one.

Tiger

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2014, 11:24:28 PM »
Hi North,

I have to comment that it seems the case that the format of the Afternoon show on BBC Stoke is pretty poor. I have listened in a few times and would be very disappointed if Stoke was my BBC local service, I think the best guests are not about celebrity, they are about localness and character. I am sure ,we are sick and tired of the the sort of celebrity guests who are only there to plug a book etc, they should not expect airtime. It takes a bit more effort to find the right guests and not plug into a PR machine. I am pleased to say that my local station is doing that now. well overdue for correct delivery of BBC local radio.

And. of course , the most important guests are the audience and every effort should be made to engage and include them and interaction with that audience is vital to the survival of BBC local radio and every managing editor should be justifying their role in delivering that. It was only 2 years ago that John Myers in his report suggested that managing editors should share across regions and he suggested that the amount of managing editors should be cut by half, because assistant editors were more than capable and the costs to local journalism was being compromised.

http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/insidethebbc/howwework/reports/pdf/bbclocalradio_myers.pdf


Managing editors of BBC local radio need to understand that they were saved by David Holdsworth and the BBC Trust, because it was believed that they were important, inspirational figures, bringing communities accountability through exceptional communication.


Just how Gary Andrews replies to listeners to BBC Stoke fit that remit, I am not sure?

darcysarto

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2014, 01:07:50 PM »
That's not us, of course! Our forum can often surprise, is rarely dull - and welcomes everyone! But it's not always the same when listening to some of the BBC's local radio, is it? You could even be excused for thinking there's a desperate ideas shortage, if today was anything to go by!

A spare hour or two was spent listening to Radio Stoke's afternoon show, as I struggled vainly to see much sign of intelligent life in a dreary, decidely same-y midweek edition. In all honesty, I began to wonder if James Watt's programme can possibly get much worse? Having presumably exhausted a limited supply of "stories making the news today", James turned his attention to that trusted old standby - what's on television tonight?

New BBC Two series, The Big Allotment Challenge was summarily dismissed as "dull television" - however you could almost sense the "lightbulb moment" as James proceeded to enquire: "What ideas do you have for your own dull television shows? Text us on 81333, starting your message with the word Stoke".

Notably, no mention of any e-mail contact address, so I can only agree with Dennis' previous concerns, that this form of communication is steadily being marginalised - so removing the danger of any measured, thoughtful comments breaking through.

Now please don't let me be misunderstood - there ought perhaps to be an element of entertainment in afternoon scheduling, with a lighter touch than the peaktime shows, such as "Breakfast", or "Drivetime". But is this the very best Radio Stoke can offer? Did we really have to lose Paula White, just to accommodate such a sub-standard substitute? If you think I'm being harsh, just think about this:

James Watt has posed pretty much the same question at least twice this year, often on a Tuesday, tending to tie in with so-called "reality" programming - often on BBC Two. Which raises one or two interesting points, doesn't it? Is he so short of inspiration that he's reduced to criticising television made by his own employers? Are those same employers so short of common sense that they're oblivious to their own employee so blatantly biting the hand that's feeding him?

I know it's not a TV forum, so it's immaterial whether you care much for The Big Allotment Challenge, or not! But it's fairly clear to this listener that - rather than accusing his own employers of providing "dull television" - James Watt ought to consider how "entertaining his own stale format isn't...


Sadly/strangely, in a lot of cases, the answer to the question you pose North, is yes.

Just been listening to a bit of James, he was chatting to Noel Sullivan from Hearsay... and asking for suggestions for television shows for Pandas (because a Panda has been given TV set in China) perhaps the Allotment programme?  Certainly not One Born Every Minute...

Anyway, you lucky peeps in the Potteries, there's a 'Best Of' the James Watt show on Friday and Monday evenings this bank holiday weekend...


mel

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2014, 01:31:18 PM »
Im not sure about the Allotment show, I guess some will think its wonderful, for myself its not.

At least all is not bad within the BBC commissioning dept,

The great and totally talented Danny Baker has been commissioned to write a comedy drama about his younger life.

He`s taking it all from his biography that came out a few years ago. The comedy show will be aired on BBC TV  late this year.

:::::::::: COMEDY . CO . UK - Click - ::::::::::::

Sometimes the beeb gets it right. . . . . well with this they have

Dennis Marshall

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2014, 05:13:37 PM »
Anyway, you lucky peeps in the Potteries, there's a 'Best Of' the James Watt show on Friday and Monday evenings this bank holiday weekend...

Quarter-hour programmes are not often found in local radio scheduling, are they? However, I find it a little surprising that they could unearth enough genuinely 'Best Of' material to concoct two separate shows. Maybe this owes more to concealing that awkward gap between both of the Bank Holiday afternoon football programmes, and the imposed National Local Radio evening show. Somewhat like Polyfilla, the James Watt show can 'go off' rapidly, with a definite tendency for flakiness.

As Bank Holidays often involve a desire to 'Do It Yourself' (as a possible antidote to boredom) I wonder perhaps if fellow Forum members could spare some valuable time this Easter, in aid of a very worthwhile cause? James appears to be struggling to devise inventive 'Nine O'Clock Connections' of his own - maybe we can help?

To understand how this feature works, I would suggest you listen to last Sunday's show, via Radio Stoke's on-line schedule. If I may summarise though, James starts proceedings each weekend by playing four records in a row, all having a common theme between them. For instance, the following pieces of music ought to qualify:

Disappear by INXS; No Reply by the Beatles; There Are More Questions Than Answers by Johnny Nash; Coward Of The County by Kenny Rogers.

Naturally, that connection ought to appeal to Radio Stoke's Managing Editor, as I felt it only right and proper to make Gary Andrews the subject: listeners' music requests all began to disappear at an alarming rate, but when our friend 'Northoftheborder' queried this, there was no reply (well not much of one, anyway). Sadly she came to the conclusion there are more questions than answers - she is not the only listener to regard his stance as an exceptionally cowardly one.

Dennis Marshall

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2014, 05:43:57 PM »
However I trust my fellow forum members can do so much better than that! When you have, I would guess that it's best sent to the presenter's own email address. I cannot honestly say I have ever heard him read it out, but would imagine it to be:  james.watt@bbc.co.uk   N.B: no 's' within his surname!

Alternatively, you could be a shade braver (as 'Northoftheborder' so admirably was) emailing the Managing Editor directly at:  gary.andrews@bbc.co.uk

As a 'belt-and-braces' measure, I believe Radio Stoke's Assistant Manging Editor's email address to be:  alistair.miskin@bbc.co.uk

I hope that together, we can all assist Radio Stoke in their hour of need, as Tiger has reminded us all of the invaluable need for managers to convincingly interact with listeners.

darcysarto

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2014, 08:30:23 AM »
However I trust my fellow forum members can do so much better than that! When you have, I would guess that it's best sent to the presenter's own email address. I cannot honestly say I have ever heard him read it out, but would imagine it to be:  james.watt@bbc.co.uk   N.B: no 's' within his surname!

Alternatively, you could be a shade braver (as 'Northoftheborder' so admirably was) emailing the Managing Editor directly at:  gary.andrews@bbc.co.uk

As a 'belt-and-braces' measure, I believe Radio Stoke's Assistant Manging Editor's email address to be:  alistair.miskin@bbc.co.uk

I hope that together, we can all assist Radio Stoke in their hour of need, as Tiger has reminded us all of the invaluable need for managers to convincingly interact with listeners.


No offence Dennis but I know a brick wall when I see one so I won't be bothering sharing any creativity, I have some other thoughts, apart from those I posted about the Trust audience councils, I'll post them later or PM you.

Rita

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2014, 01:34:54 PM »
This is for Northoftheborder and Denis Marshall.

This morning between 8.00 a.m. and 12 noon I was privileged to be tuned in to Radio Merseyside to listen to the superb show presented by Frankie Connor.  The email service was down, for which Frankie apologised but he invited listeners to either 'phone-in or text.  He made a very pertinent point in the show by saying "your input is our output".  As you can imagine the text and 'phones were very busy.  As I've said before, Radio Merseyside's success over the years has been through "interaction" and that continues to be the case today.  It seems to me a pity that Gary Andrews obviously does not consider "interaction" important - but I would say that it is vital if listeners should continue to be satisfied with the service it is receiving.  If you care to listen to Frankie's show on the "play it again" facility you will enjoy it immensely, as I did.  Roger Lyon, another superb presenter is on air tomorrow noon - 3.00 p.m. followed by Frankie 3.00 p.m. - 5.30 p.m.   Frankie is also on air Monday 9.00 a.m. - 12 noon.  I can assure you of an excellent "listen".
Happy Easter to you all on the Forum.



Tiger

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2014, 08:04:14 PM »
Dear Rita, Happy Easter to you and all.

You are indeed very fortunate with presenters on Merseyside who understand that BBC local radio is about community and contribution.

I would have to comment that email is a very suitable form of contribution to BBC local radio. Text and tweets are for those national broadcasters with little time. Having heard James Watt on BBC Stoke and some like him in that format, I would say that the one thing they do have is time on their hands, in fact time that moved very slowly! If you want as a station to rely on the personality of the presenter, then unfortunately you need to know that Steve Wright on Radio2 already has that gig! And the value of BBC local radio is actually hearing from the listeners.

Rustey .

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2014, 07:13:27 PM »
Its not such a bad idea that Dennis put up here the other day! Lots of things have already been said about the James Watt show (but not many of them good ones) and if you remember a fortnight ago - the other person had the idea for us to compare his Sunday morning Radio Stoke show with one on Radio Merseyside. I did that and it was so right what was put - the Merseyside one was far much more open with their listeners! Their presenter Jason often reminded us about the phone and text numbers AND the email adress as well! But if you listen to any shows James Watt does - he NEVER mentions his own email adress. I think he does read out the studio.stoke one now and then (but only when he wants to appeal for some new teams for that quiz he does in the week).

There could be all sorts of reasons why James Watt never reads out his email adress. If you go back just one year the lovely Paula White was on the weekday afternoon show. She would read out her own email adress pretty often - and she would make it fairly clear when her listeners sent something in that way. So what changed? Well they never used to have the studio.stoke email (I think it started last summer but am not sure) but what exactly is the idea behind that? Do other BBC local radio stations have anything like this? As far as I can tell all it will end up doing - is directing all the emails to one central point. So if you think about it all the emails will get vetted - before the presenter even gets chance to see them! But thats not how text mesages work is it? Everyone always tells us how they come straight into their studio. So would they rather have texts? Theres so much more you can say in an email (like Tiger said) but is that the problem? Looks so much like dumbing down from where I am!

Its not as if they remind listeners that much about ANY of the email adresses anyway! So are they trying to run down this way of getting in touch? If the idea of all BBC local radio is to Be Part Of It - then why are Radio Stoke going their own way (when it comes to emailing stuff) especially when we have all heard how open Radio Merseyside are to emails? That can only be a decision made by their Managing Editor (unless it has something to do with his boss) so will that be someone in Birmingham? When you compare shows (like we did the other weekend) you can often find yourself wondering why the stations are so different! But why? Are there not common standards anymore? Not sure why I asked that - Radio Merseyside will gladly let their listeners join in (and even let them send in whole programme ideas) and their Managing Editor does not seem to have a problem with going on her own station - does she? But if you try and ask Radio Stoke a fairly simple question (however nicely put) its such a different story.

If you remember the last post I wrote was for the thread called: Which part of question is so hard to understand? Just to remind you my friend decided to approach Radio Stoke - as he did not understand why the Love Bus week of broadcasts was totally missing out Cheshire (which the service licence for Radio Stoke says they should cover - along with Staffordshire). He did this in plenty of time before the week of outside broadcasts were planned. Although I am no mind reader I guess he thought the sooner you ask a polite question the better. Although he did just that (and politely asked why the Love Bus was only serving the Stoke area) he did not get a very respectful answer. After emailing the radio.stoke adress he got a pretty quick response from Gary Andrews (the Managing Editor) which was fairly short and to the point. Basically all he put was: If you have a complaint about Radio Stoke then you must go through the BBC Complaints unit.

Sorry but I still cannot understand the point of this? How was asking why the Love Bus will only be serving Stoke actually any kind of a complaint? Just how can someone complain about something thats not yet taken place? Although I have never used the BBC Complaints webform my friend has. They take around seven to ten days to not actually answer the question and as far as we can see they are just a stalling tactic to drag things out and waste more of our valuable time (and patience) and they include a load of rubbish about how this is meant to ensure efficient use of your licence fee. That is not worth the paper its not printed on though as (if licence fees were being spent wisely) then their Love Bus would not have totally left out a large part of the area Radio Stoke claims to broadcast to. Why on earth could a simple question (that was put politely) not be directly answered? And by the person we are paying to manage something that is supposed to represent our local area?

You might think I went off the point a bit! But its SO very clear how short Radio Stoke are of original ideas (if you listen for around half an hour of most days - you will soon see what I mean) so why are they not much more keen to let their listeners join in? And why are they running down all the mentions of emailing (as they so obviously are)? Without the chance to email you cannot send in clever ideas (or well-thought out stuff) can you? But much more importantly - why is no one keen to answer one or two simple questions about Radio Stoke? As its little more than constructive criticism - what is there to be afraid of? Are they so scared their hidden agenda might be exposed - for what it is?

Rustey .

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Re: Are we really this short of ideas??
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2014, 07:32:59 PM »
To update you on the last story - as my friend was far from happy he did his own research and re-sent his polite question to the boss of Gary Andrews (who you will know is called David Jennings) but he just got the same old story - you should submit it via BBC Complaints to ensure the most efficient use of your licence fee. The next time he emailed Mr. Jennings he warned him that he would take his concerns somewhere else (but got no answer) so then he had to contact his local MP. That is another story for another time - but it does get us back to the point! Not long after the 9.00 Connection started (the beginning of February) my friend sent his own clever idea to James Watt - but no one ever bothered to reply. So he waited three weeks and re-sent his email (with one or two changes) to James Watt. Again James Watt could not bother to give any answer - but this time he passed it straight on to his Managing Editor (and his assistant) and this was all Gary Andrews had to say:

As you know, you have been asked to write to the BBC complaints unit for the reasons already communicated, not Radio Stoke.

After a couple of weeks my friend rang up one Sunday morning - with the right answer to the 9.00 Connection for that week. He asked the person who answered (who we think may have some kind of production role) if they had had any plans to let listeners send in their own ideas? My friend was told that he thought they were just letting this feature bed in - then they would let listeners have a go. So he left it at that. But two or three more weeks passed and still no sign of anything sent in by the listeners! So he rang in again (on another Sunday morning) and spoke to the same person - who repeated the same story about the feature being allowed to bed in. My friend patiently explained what he had already done (and what the unhelpful management response had been) then at this point the guy from Radio Stoke said - you can email your idea to me (and I will pass it on) and so he gave out his own personal BBC email adress. My friend thanked him and went away to re-send his email. The day after he sent it he got a short reply [Thanks. I have forwarded this to the person who looks after the show. Regards]. Then a couple of days later he got another email:

I write regarding your recent correspondence to BBC Radio Stoke, the text of which is copied below to ensure absolute clarity.

You have been advised on several occasions that if you wish to register a complaint or comment regarding the BBC you should use the BBCs centrally handled complaints process.

I must now remind you of this again and explain you that if you contact BBC Radio Stoke or any of its staff directly any such correspondence will not be read or responded to.

If you wish us to log any views, you should contact BBC Audience Services via: ONLINE:www.bbc.co.uk/complaints (has options for complaint, comment, questions or appreciations)

POST: BBC Audience Services, PO Box 1922, Darlington, DL3 0UR                         PHONE: 03700 100 222 (available 24 hours a day, charged as 01/02 geographic numbers)

Yours sincerely

Paul Moseley

Senior Complaints Adviser, BBC Audience Services


Not sure what any of you think - but that reads to me like an outright ban on contacting Radio Stoke (in any way) as it does not make it clear what they mean by "contact" does it? As you may have guessed my friend emailed Mr. Moseley and asked him to clarify what his vague words meant please? Of course all Mr. Moseley would do was repeat his original statement - about registering comments and complaints through the centrally handled BBC Complaints process.

So thats what happens when someone tries to Be Part Of It. Maybe Darcy was right all along and the Radio Stoke wall of unfriendliness has twice the layer of bricks that it did last year. If you remember my first ever post - a part-time Radio Stoke stand-in presenter stole the original idea my friend had sent in (when we WERE encouraged to) and passed it off as his own. Something else to bear in mind though - only a week before this Paul Moseley sent the email above - my friend got the reply from his MP (which included a letter from the Director-General) and some rather out-of-date examples from Radio Stoke trying to dig themselves out of their own mess regarding not covering Cheshire.

So you will not need me to say that Radio Stoke have just taken underhand tit-for-tat action on a long-time listener - just because he dared to stand up for himself (and his own county) again. I think its as low as you can get but my friend does not care any more. Fortunately we have the far better neighbouring BBC local stations to retune to - where we CAN still Be Part Of It. Maybe theres a lesson in all this - its time more people exposed the nasty way Radio Stoke treats their audience. Or you could all team up instead (like Dennis said) and send them some clever ideas for the James Watt 9.00 Connection! Then they might have to sit up and take notice of the listeners (for a change).



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