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Author Topic:  Life Without The BBC  (Read 2806 times)

darcysarto

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Life Without The BBC
« on: August 25, 2015, 09:10:42 PM »
The BBC has published the results of an experiment/research in which 70 households from different areas, with differing views of BBC output, went without the BBC for just over a week.

Astonishingly some of these people didn't realise their licence fee also pays for BBC Radio.. where on earth did they think it was coming from?

The full report can be found here: http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/aboutthebbc/reports/pdf/lifewithoutthebbc.pdf

The 70 households in the research from 15 locations across the UK comprised those that initially said, given the choice, they would:
 prefer to pay nothing and not receive the BBC (x 24) reflective of 12% of all UK households
 only pay less than the current licence fee for the current BBC (x 24) reflective of 16% of all UK households
 be willing to pay the full licence fee or more (x 22) reflective of 69% of all UK households.


Here's a few of the things they had to say about Radio.

The households that changed their minds often also found BBC Radio hard to replace. They were especially frustrated at the high volume of advertising on commercial stations.  As the BBC station with the highest reach, the most missed BBC Radio station was Radio 2. In particular this was missed by older, regular listeners and those with long car journeys. These audiences admitted that they under appreciated the quality of the stations talent, in particular during commuting hours. They missed their regular shows, the music mix within them and the features and familiarity of the voices on air. Despite trying numerous alternatives, audiences felt that they were unable to find content of the quality they enjoyed on Radio 2.

Radio 4 was especially difficult for audiences who listened to this to replace, in particular the 'Today' programme. These respondents cited a lack of credible commercial speech radio alternatives, to the extent where they no longer listened to talk radio during the task period.

BBC Radio 5live could be replaced to a certain extent by TalkSPORT for sports news and information, but audiences still missed 5live's tone of news and sports coverage. As a substitute, TalkSPORT was not felt by these households to deliver the same calibre of discussion, debate and insight.

BBC Local Radio (relevant to their area) was also missed owing to the mix of localised news,  weather, traffic and sport live commentaries. Often audiences relied on this information to plan their days / journeys and without it were forced to seek other methods of finding this, which they found difficult to do especially to the level of detail (and reliability) that the BBC Local Radio
station provided them with.

BBC Asian Network was missed by some of the BAME households because they enjoyed the mix of music and news from Asian communities without interruptions. Typically, they had to go online to replace this (news especially).

Finally, the young er audiences who missed BBC Radio 1 did so because of specific DJs they tune  in for as well as the ability to hear the latest music and new music not confined to the charts. Also audiences commented how they relied on the station to create or fit their mood at certain times of the day or week, for example getting ready for a night out on a weekend. The younger audiences replaced Radio 1 with commercial alternatives, their own music system or by using streaming services or YouTube. Although they were more accepting of the commercials, they still valued the advert-free nature of Radio 1 and missed the ability to have a single station that they did not have to keep re-tuning when adverts came on.

darcysarto

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Re: Life Without The BBC
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2015, 09:15:39 PM »
Astonishingly some of these people didn't realise their licence fee also pays for BBC Radio.. where on earth did they think it was coming from?

Conversely, I can't quite believe that it goes towards paying for things like this http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-34048459 - journalism apparently..

Rita

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Re: Life Without The BBC
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2015, 09:24:20 PM »
Seen in a national paper column on Friday 4 September

Cut jobsworths not new shows

"Once again we are told the BBC is determined to cut its costs.  How?  By screening more repeats.  Which is quite a gymnastic exercise since, apart from the news, I can't discern much that is not already a repeat.
When I switch on the idiot's  lantern and run through the menu of the first 50 pages of programmes it seems to be a solid phalanx of dirt-cheap junk, so-called "reality" shows (meaning choreographed to the last gesture and an insult to a functioning brain) or repeats right back to Dad's Army (brilliant in its day but now so old it's being made into a film with an entirely new cast  as all but two of the originals have died of old age.
There is a way to cut costs and improve quality but it's called firing 50 per cent of the huge army of jobsworths who clutter the monolith from floor to ceiling".

Rita

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Re: Life Without The BBC
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2015, 08:14:21 AM »
Seen in a national paper today

BBC shows face the axe as cash dries up

"Popular programmes and presenters face the axe as the BBC struggles for money.
In a barely disguised attack yesterday, director-general Lord hall said the Chancellor's July Budget had left the corporation facing "some very difficult choices ahead" and some services would have to be slashed.
In a bleak prediction for the future of the broadcaster, Lord Hall warned it would have to radically reinvent itself as cash dries up.
His downbeat comments came as the BBC battles with the Government over the details of its charter, up for renewal in 2017.
The corporation has already agreed to shoulder the cost of free television licences for those aged over 75.  It will cost an estimated 750 million by 2020, almost a fifth of the corporation's current annual income.
Lord Hall, 64, said it meant the BBC would have to save 20 per cent of its income over the next five years at a time when its share of TV revenues was likely to fall.
He said "The BBC faces a very tough financial challenge.  So we will have to manage our resources ever more carefully and prioritise what we believe the BBC should offer.  We will inevitably have to either close or reduce some services.
We will have to change the way we work.  We all want a simpler, more effective organisation where as much money as possible goes on programmes and services."
His comments come after Culture Secretary John Whittingdale questioned whether the corporation should be "all things to all people" or have amore "precisely targeted" mission.
In details announced yesterday the BBC suggested "some existing services" might no longer be needed.
Proposals on how savings will be made and which services might be scrapped will be announced in the coming months, but it is certain some programmes will be jettisoned.
Lord Hall promised and "open BBC" which collaborates with rival media and the public and serves as a "catalyst for this country's incredible talent".
He said "It has occasionally been suggested the BBC should stop being a mainstream entertainer because the market can provide mainstream entertainment.
"But is anyone seriously going to propose to licence fee payers their fee should only go to the niche programmes and services, that we should stop doing all the things they love most?
"What makes the BBC work is precisely the combination of popular programming with the depth and range only a public service broadcaster can guarantee".
Proposals for a new "open BBC" include plans for a multi-million pound partnership with local news groups to provide a network of 100 "public service reporters".
Bosses also want to create a new on-demand children's service called iPlay and an "ideas service" linking BBC programmes with material from partners including the British Museum and Royal Shakespeare Company.
Lord Hall said "An open BBC is a million miles away from an expansionist ambition.  Indeed, it is the polar opposite"


I notice Lord Hall has not mentioned local radio stations and what will happen to them in the future.  Neither has he mentioned the exorbitant salaries which top management and top presenters are paid - perhaps they should start there and make sure that LOCAL radio is maintained.

Rita

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Re: Life Without The BBC
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2015, 09:08:28 PM »
This was a column in a local newspaper on Friday 18 September and makes interesting reading.
"Will the future of the BBC be set out by Rupert Murdoch"
The current consultation on the future of the BBC will appeal to the resurgent Murdoch empire. Rebekah Brooks is back to "lead a great team at News UK into the digital future, while maximising the influence and reach of our newspapers, which remain the most informative and successful in Britain and beyond". So said Robert Thomson, chief executive of News Corp.
The BBC licence fee revenue pays for the BBC's television, radio and online services, and services outside the commercial sector for the public benefit including Welsh broadcaster S4C, the nationwide digital switchover and superfast broadband infrastructure.  The excellent BBC World Service is to expand and, for the first time, there will be a daily news broadcast on short wave radio into North Korea.  The BBC will soon have to meet the cost of free licences for the over-75s.
The current Secretary of State for Culture Media and Sports, John Whittingdale MP says that the BBC is "at the very heart of Britain".  However, the likely change is to  have a narrower BBC.  In short, less BBC output will provide more opportunity for News Corp to encourage and entice subscription to its services.
The BBCs total investment  in original TV content is understood to be about the same level as BSkyB's operating profits over the last year.  The BBC's ability to compete for talent and rights is under threat.
Responses to the consultation[www.gov.uk/government /consultations/bbc-charter-review-public-consultation] need to be made by October 8.  I fear that they will not make any difference.  Regardless of the views of the public , the political decision as to the future of the BBC may have already been reached, having followed the familiar pattern of elected politicians being manipulated into making decisions that neatly coincide with the most powerful media empire".


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